#RubbleBucketChallenge? “Why?” You say…

We previously mentioned how the Ice Bucket Challenge was raising awareness of water scarcity issues.  However, we can add a great attempt to do the same.  Check out the RubbleBucketChallenge brought to you on Facebook by a poster in Gaza:

In Gaza we don’t have water and when we have water, we can’t make it ice since the electricity is off most of the time. So my cousin Hafiz, My nephew Khalid and I used remains of a destroyed house to participate in this challenge.. I am not nominating anyone for this challenge but I am asking you all to show solidarity with Palestinians and to participate in this challenge..
Thank you in advance

Gaza is just one of many locations dealing with a water crisis.  War is enough to put any country in this position, with drastic effects on its citizens.

I wrote Inevitable to raise awareness of this problem, but this Facebook post may do more than any book I could write.

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#WorldWaterWeek Starts Sunday

World Water Week opens up this Sunday in Stockholm, Sweden.  You can get details by going to www.worldwaterweek.org.

Some estimates say as many as 800 million people do not have sufficient access to water.  That number will not decrease on its own.  There needs to be an effort towards sustainability, and preservation of water for the world, or soon there will only be so many actions that will have any impact.  What could those be?  What happens when there isn’t enough water to go around for energy, medicine, agriculture, livestock, not to mention human consumption?  You tell me in the comments.

#WorldWaterWeek Starts Sunday

World Water Week opens up this Sunday in Stockholm, Sweden.  You can get details by going to www.worldwaterweek.org.

Some estimates say as many as 800 million people do not have sufficient access to water.  That number will not decrease on its own.  There needs to be an effort towards sustainability, and preservation of water for the world, or soon there will only be so many actions that will have any impact.  What could those be?  What happens when there isn’t enough water to go around for energy, medicine, agriculture, livestock, not to mention human consumption?  You tell me in the comments.

#IceBucketChallenge Exposes #WaterScarcity Realities

I’m all for the ALS Ice Bucket challenge.  Well, I’m all for raising money to combat the terrible disease known as ALS.  But now the Ice Bucket Challenge should also be raising awareness of the water crisis we all face now, particularly in a small town in Scotland:

The water supply to the Inner Hebridean island, with a population of around 135 people was automatically switched off at least five times over the weekend after more than 100 residents took the ice plunge over their heads. The water supply had to be manually switched back on again to allow its residents access to H20.

Water is a natural resource with a limited end.  We all need to figure out how to manage it.  This type of problem isn’t just in small town in Scotland though.  We have seen these crises pop up in Toledo and California lately.  We all need water.  We all need to preserve it.

Latest #Review of Inevitable Alerts Blogger to #WaterScarcity Problem

Inevitable has gotten another positive review, this time from blogger Alison Baxter of Baxter’s Book Nook.

While reading Nace’s book, I admired his ability to create a dystopian society that, scary as it is to think about, seems realistic. Obviously one hopes that nothing like the circumstances of Inevitable come to pass in the real world, but the most successful dystopian societies created in books are ones where the reader is able to sit back and think “that could actually happen.” Also, where Nace’s writing really shines in the book is in discussion of laws and the balancing of government. I was actually prompted to think about situations in today’s government and society that seem similar to those in Inevitable.

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I finished the book in less than 48 hours, so that has to tell you something. I definitely would recommend this book to others!

Glad you liked it Alison!  Hopefully you are also aware of the real life water scarcity issues the world faces now too.  So, what is the answer to this problem?

Get your copy of Inevitable today by clicking here or here for mobile.

The Rain in Spain, Apparently, Doesn’t Fall on the Plain At All

Water scarcity is a world wide problem. Time to act now before a crisis hits and drastic action is taken.

Waterless World

From The Olive Press

The worst drought in 150 years is threatening eastern and southern Spain. Huge storms have been buffeting the Atlantic coast, but the last eight months have been brutally dry inland, ruining harvests and putting farmers out of business.

Valencia and Alicante are among the worst hit areas, where rainfall has been down to just 25% of average levels, according to meteorological agency Aemet.

Ana Casals, a spokesperson for Aemet, said that rainfall has not been this low since records began 150 years ago.

TV meteorologist Jose Antonio Maldonado added: “We have never seen such a long and intense drought. Even during the second worst period of drought on record, there was twice as much rain as there is now.”

The average capacity of reservoirs in Andalucia is between 74 and 90%, but current levels are significantly lower – in Juzcar, in Malaga, it was down to…

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More Reviews of Inevitable

Inevitable by Jonathan Nace

More positive reviews for Inevitable keep coming.  Pick up your copy at the Kindle store by clicking here or here for mobile site.

I could not put this story down. The premise is realistic and plausible. The characters are well drawn with good dynamics between them. The plot line has a good flow that is easy to read and follow. Lots of action and suspense. We make decisions that we feel are right at the time. But then later, there comes a time when things need to be changed. I received this from the author for an honest review. No compensation involved. Outstanding!!! Will recommend to any and all.

And another:

This was an intellectually amazing book. It makes you stop and think about real-world problems rather than the monopoly of dystopian challenges.

 

It was a very interesting read with an economic spin on it.

 

The author…

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