#WaterScarcity Competition Seeks Innovation

Water scarcity is a big problem for the Colorado River Basin states out West, including Arizona.  And Arizona seems to be well aware of it as they are now holding a contest pushing for innovative ideas:

A $100,000 prize awaits the group that comes up with the most innovative ­campaign to push water scarcity into the forefront of public ­conversation.

The Water Consciousness Challenge is the first phase of the New Arizona Prize offered by the Arizona Community Foundation in collaboration with The Arizona Republic and the Morrison Institute for Public Policy. Underwriting for the program comes from the Tashman Fund and the Lodestar Foundation.

When I wrote Inevitable, my cynical side let me imagine that there was no innovative solution.  Other than the population control installed which serves as the centerpiece setting for the novel.  I hope you engineers, entrepreneurs and scientists can come up with something better.

Advertisements

So You Want To Be A Writer? New radio show to get you started

Nail Your Novel

tim fran and bookshop recording sept 034smlEvery week, my bookseller friend Peter Snell gets customers who ask him nervously: ‘how do I write’ and ‘how do I get published’? Sometimes they give him manuscripts or book proposals. I get emails with the same questions.

So we decided to team up for a series of shows for Surrey Hills Radio. If you’re a regular on this blog, you’re probably beyond starter-level advice, but if you’re feeling your way, or your friends or family have always hankered to do what you do, this might be just the ticket.

If you follow me on Facebook you’ll have seen the various pictures of us goofing with a fuzzy microphone, recording in the bookshop while customers slink past with bemused expressions. (Yes, that tiny gizmo is the complete mobile recording kit. It’s adorable.) So far the shows have been available only at the time of broadcast on Surrey Hills Radio (Wed…

View original post 104 more words

South Africa #WaterShortage Affects Energy Production

We recently highlighted how water scarcity is affecting energy production in Iraq.  We mentioned there how oil is a global resource and so the implications of less oil in Iraq causes problems worldwide, including in the US.  Now, we have a quick tidbit about water scarcity affecting energy in South Africa:

Rand Water has once again attributed the current water supply crisis , which has affected large parts of Johannesburg and surrounds, to protracted power outages.

The problem, which was caused by a power cut at a main pumping station, has been described as a “perfect storm”.

Its a global economy, and the question is when does the race to the bottom really begin?  And what does that race look like?

Finally, be on the lookout for a free book giveaway coming up for Inevitable.  We’ll have more details shortly.

#WaterScarcity Hurting #Iraq #Oil Production

The prologue of Inevitable explains how water scarcity poses a broader problem set than simply a lack of drinking water.  We’ve written on this blog numerous times about how water scarcity ultimately touches nearly every industry we rely upon.  Energy is a big one.  We’ve also written about how in a global economy, no matter where this problem first surfaces, it will affect us all.  Now, we see how water scarcity is causing problems for the Iraq oil industry:

A lack of water threatens Iraq’s plans to raise its oil output, boost its stumbling economy and become a leading producer in the region after Saudi Arabia.

A multi-billion dollar common seawater injection scheme designed to boost production from the giant export oilfields in Iraq’s south is snarled up in red tape and acrimony.

Don’t forget, America still gets much of its oil from the middle east, and that includes Iraq.  Still not convinced, just remember that if water scarcity is affecting oil production in Iraq, there’s no reason to believe numerous other countries in the middle-east and beyond won’t soon have the same problem.

Politico Reports: Water Drought Affects CA Food Supply

Politico’s front page story on its newspaper today reported on the effect the California drought is having on the food industry there:

Thanks to the historic drought in California, prices may spike for the specialty rice used in the popular Japanese dish. Production of the rice, which is grown primarily in the Golden State, is expected to drop by 25 percent this year.

California — and the Sacramento Valley in particular — is the nation’s primary source for the high-quality short- and medium-grain rice used in sushi and is a major supplier of the rice for other countries, too. But the state’s 2,500 rice growers this year planted just 420,000 acres, about a quarter fewer than usual, because farmers weren’t allowed to use water for more, according to the California Rice Commission.

A theme on these news stories is that at first glance you may chuckle.  But, look closer.  The water drought is affecting the price and availability of food for one of the largest economies in the world – the State of California.  Nothing funny about that.  Its time to start taking the water crisis seriously or the future will look a lot like Inevitable where food and water rationing are only a prerequisite to the imposition of term limits on life.

#RubbleBucketChallenge? “Why?” You say…

We previously mentioned how the Ice Bucket Challenge was raising awareness of water scarcity issues.  However, we can add a great attempt to do the same.  Check out the RubbleBucketChallenge brought to you on Facebook by a poster in Gaza:

In Gaza we don’t have water and when we have water, we can’t make it ice since the electricity is off most of the time. So my cousin Hafiz, My nephew Khalid and I used remains of a destroyed house to participate in this challenge.. I am not nominating anyone for this challenge but I am asking you all to show solidarity with Palestinians and to participate in this challenge..
Thank you in advance

Gaza is just one of many locations dealing with a water crisis.  War is enough to put any country in this position, with drastic effects on its citizens.

I wrote Inevitable to raise awareness of this problem, but this Facebook post may do more than any book I could write.

#WorldWaterWeek Starts Sunday

World Water Week opens up this Sunday in Stockholm, Sweden.  You can get details by going to www.worldwaterweek.org.

Some estimates say as many as 800 million people do not have sufficient access to water.  That number will not decrease on its own.  There needs to be an effort towards sustainability, and preservation of water for the world, or soon there will only be so many actions that will have any impact.  What could those be?  What happens when there isn’t enough water to go around for energy, medicine, agriculture, livestock, not to mention human consumption?  You tell me in the comments.

When the crisis hits, there will be only one decision left to make.