Tag Archives: Books

#WorldWaterWeek Starts Sunday

World Water Week opens up this Sunday in Stockholm, Sweden.  You can get details by going to www.worldwaterweek.org.

Some estimates say as many as 800 million people do not have sufficient access to water.  That number will not decrease on its own.  There needs to be an effort towards sustainability, and preservation of water for the world, or soon there will only be so many actions that will have any impact.  What could those be?  What happens when there isn’t enough water to go around for energy, medicine, agriculture, livestock, not to mention human consumption?  You tell me in the comments.

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#WorldWaterWeek Starts Sunday

World Water Week opens up this Sunday in Stockholm, Sweden.  You can get details by going to www.worldwaterweek.org.

Some estimates say as many as 800 million people do not have sufficient access to water.  That number will not decrease on its own.  There needs to be an effort towards sustainability, and preservation of water for the world, or soon there will only be so many actions that will have any impact.  What could those be?  What happens when there isn’t enough water to go around for energy, medicine, agriculture, livestock, not to mention human consumption?  You tell me in the comments.

#IceBucketChallenge Exposes #WaterScarcity Realities

I’m all for the ALS Ice Bucket challenge.  Well, I’m all for raising money to combat the terrible disease known as ALS.  But now the Ice Bucket Challenge should also be raising awareness of the water crisis we all face now, particularly in a small town in Scotland:

The water supply to the Inner Hebridean island, with a population of around 135 people was automatically switched off at least five times over the weekend after more than 100 residents took the ice plunge over their heads. The water supply had to be manually switched back on again to allow its residents access to H20.

Water is a natural resource with a limited end.  We all need to figure out how to manage it.  This type of problem isn’t just in small town in Scotland though.  We have seen these crises pop up in Toledo and California lately.  We all need water.  We all need to preserve it.

Latest #Review of Inevitable Alerts Blogger to #WaterScarcity Problem

Inevitable has gotten another positive review, this time from blogger Alison Baxter of Baxter’s Book Nook.

While reading Nace’s book, I admired his ability to create a dystopian society that, scary as it is to think about, seems realistic. Obviously one hopes that nothing like the circumstances of Inevitable come to pass in the real world, but the most successful dystopian societies created in books are ones where the reader is able to sit back and think “that could actually happen.” Also, where Nace’s writing really shines in the book is in discussion of laws and the balancing of government. I was actually prompted to think about situations in today’s government and society that seem similar to those in Inevitable.

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I finished the book in less than 48 hours, so that has to tell you something. I definitely would recommend this book to others!

Glad you liked it Alison!  Hopefully you are also aware of the real life water scarcity issues the world faces now too.  So, what is the answer to this problem?

Get your copy of Inevitable today by clicking here or here for mobile.

National Geographic: Watch the Aquifers

“Nat Geo” has an article up on the pending loss of America’s aquifers, which are an important fresh water resource.  Succinctly put:

Aquifers provide us freshwater that makes up for surface water lost from drought-depleted lakes, rivers, and reservoirs. We are drawing down these hidden, mostly nonrenewable groundwater supplies at unsustainable rates in the western United States and in several dry regions globally, threatening our future.

Inevitable sets out a story of how America will undoubtedly react to this problem, or more accurately fail to react.  Now is the time, but like we see in Inevitable, we have done nothing.  It will take an unmitigated crisis before anyone starts to address the drying Colorado River Basin and the Ogallala Aquifer.  These are being depleted now, but they are not infinite.  Like any natural resource they need to be preserved.

 

WP: West’s historic drought stokes fears of water crisis

The Washington Post reports today on the front page of its news section that the water crisis is starting to scare some people in California.

Now, across California’s vital agricultural belt, nervousness over the state’s epic drought has given way to alarm. Streams and lakes have long since shriveled up in many parts of the state, and now the aquifers — always a backup source during the region’s periodic droughts — are being pumped away at rates that scientists say are both historic and unsustainable.

When I hear words like “unsustainable” I think back to Inevitable.  What also makes me think of my constitutional thriller novel is the fact that there is apparently zero political response to this problem.  Now is the time, before its too late, but nothing is being done.  California – and the rest of the West – is just crossing its fingers and waiting for rain.  When it doesn’t come, will the government react as they did in the prologue of Inevitable?  Check it out for free at the Kindle store by clicking here and then selecting “Send Sample Now” on the right hand side.

More Reviews of Inevitable

More positive reviews for Inevitable keep coming.  Pick up your copy at the Kindle store by clicking here or here for mobile site.

I could not put this story down. The premise is realistic and plausible. The characters are well drawn with good dynamics between them. The plot line has a good flow that is easy to read and follow. Lots of action and suspense. We make decisions that we feel are right at the time. But then later, there comes a time when things need to be changed. I received this from the author for an honest review. No compensation involved. Outstanding!!! Will recommend to any and all.

And another:

This was an intellectually amazing book. It makes you stop and think about real-world problems rather than the monopoly of dystopian challenges.

 

It was a very interesting read with an economic spin on it.

 

The author does a beautiful job of writing the story. You don’t know how many potentially great books I’ve read that were only dismal because of the writing or grammar. The characters and story was relatable, and that is not easy to do. Having relatable characters and a relatable story are probably on entirely different galaxies. Anyone can make a relatable character, but the feeling of connecting with the story itself is not something I come across often.

 

So, kudos to you, Mr. Nace. You’ve imposed the near impossible as approachable and given it a stability that others can relate to while also creating witty, fun characters.